Tag Archives: Logics

Weekly Spotted

Due to other personal obligations, I am finding way too little time to write on TES. However, I am collecting noteworthy stuff everyday by myself and referrals. I will begin to simply put some of the links in a weekly or fortnightly format.  The idea is to provide some dots to connect (or argue against) – and every now and then some own piece. Of course you’ll get all of this served with occasional sarcasm:

FED basically confirms that it was front-run until June 2013

On 13th of May the Businessweek referred to an academic study that strongly suggests (’empirically robust’) that information about what next decision the FED would take, have been consistently leaked at least from 1997 to 2013.  Soon thereafter Businessweek updated their article adding the FED statement. It says that the FED took measures last October (2013) to avoid this in the future. Of course, using the following contemporanous approach, nobody could expect that to happen. How could cow-bell-ringing possibly not be appropriate anymore in 2013 to make sure nobody leaks it before?

In response, Federal Reserve spokesman Joe Pavel said that the Fed “enhanced its media release security procedures” last October “to better protect the information against premature release.” The Fed used to ring a cowbell to announce when news media could send out reports over open lines. Now it seals reporters off from the outside world during the “lockup” and flips a switch to open the communications circuit when the news embargo is lifted.


Inflation starts with the Economists sentiments towards it

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What is Fate? The Rationalization of the Human Mind!

I want to talk about fate. I’ll start with some thoughts on the most recent econtalk podcast by Russ Roberts. Russ talks with John Ralston Saul about his book “Voltaire’s bastards” and how we abuse the use of reason today. The abstract:

Saul argues that the illegitimate offspring of the champions of reason have led to serious problems in the modern world. Reason, while powerful and useful, says Saul, should not be put on a pedestal above other values including morality and common-sense. Saul argues that the worship of reason has corrupted public policy and education while empowering technocrats and the elites in dangerous and unhealthy ways.

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When Keynes is Hayek and Menger is Schmoller

For a long time, economics felt to me to be strictly divided in schools, or at least mainstream and “weirdos”. It seems though, that wherever I thought there was a big, even war-like discrepancy between economists on some topic or person, it falls apart when I dig into it. I admit it may be my very subjective impression – of course it is nurtured by the actors strive for profiling or just popular videos, etc. However I think I have a case here. Let me give you three examples:

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